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Contents:
  1. Ladies of Fashion
  2. Top Authors
  3. The World of the Eighteenth Century (for English Majors): Costume
  4. Clothing through American History: The Federal Era through Antebellum, –

Citations with abstracts to books and journal articles in the fields of sport, fitness, and related disciplines. Web of Science. Multidisciplinary database that indexes the Berg fashion and textile journals, among others.

United States

It is illustrated with more than 2, images — many of which are unpublished, or rare. Coverage includes the origins of clothing and body adornment, the development of fabrics and technologies, and the social meanings of dress, as well as representative costumes from a wide range of historical eras.


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Apparel, Merchandising, Design, and Textiles: Apparel Resources for research in apparel, merchandising, design, and textiles. Databases, Indexes, Specialized Resources Academic Search Complete A comprehensive scholarly, multi-disciplinary full-text database, with more than 8, full-text periodicals, including more than 7, peer-reviewed journals. AnthropologyPlus Indexes articles and essays on archaeology, biological, physical, cultural and social anthropology, and linguistics. Ethnic NewsWatch Interdisciplinary, bilingual English and Spanish and comprehensive full text database of newspapers, magazines and journals from ethnic, minority and native presses.

Historical Abstracts Contains citations and abstracts to publications covering the history of the world excluding the United States and Canada from to the present. Sociological Abstracts Citations with abstracts to articles on all aspects of sociology, social work, and other social sciences since SPORTDiscus Citations with abstracts to books and journal articles in the fields of sport, fitness, and related disciplines. Web of Science Multidisciplinary database that indexes the Berg fashion and textile journals, among others.

Print Reference Books. B47 Survey of Historic Costume by Phyllis G. Tortora; Sara B.

Ladies of Fashion

Marcketti ISBN: Now celebrating its 25th anniversary, Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition is an introduction to dress from the ancient world through the 21st century. Each chapter presents social, cross-cultural, environmental, geographic, and artistic influences on clothing.


  • Clothing through American History;
  • Saúl (Spanish Edition);
  • Clothing through American History: The Federal Era through Antebellum, 1786-1860;

S73 The suit is uniquely American in design, reflecting the more casual and relaxed nature of American society of the 19th century, especially compared to the rigid social hierarchies that existed in Europe and Britain. Fandrich; Susan W. W37 Learn what men, women, and children have worn and why in American history, beginning with the classical styles worn in the early American republic through the hoop skirts and ready-made clothes worn before the Civil War. For men, starched detachable collars were replaced by soft button-down shirts, and the top hat gave way to a variety of less formal hats such as the fedora or homburg.

Active sportswear influenced the styles worn by younger men, who embraced soft caps and sweaters. Shorter skirts placed greater importance on stylish shoes and hosiery, two industries Philadelphia had long dominated. By early years of the twentieth century, however, New York eclipsed Philadelphia as the apparel style and production leader of the United States.

While this was not an entirely accurate assessment, plays like The Philadelphia Story , with its Main Line socialite protagonist, reinforced this popular view.

Top Authors

By the turn of the twentieth century large department stores and specialty shops tempted consumers with a wide variety of ready-made goods and gained acceptance with the fashionable elite. Consumers were more fashion-conscious due to the emergence of fashion shows held at department stores, hotels, and private social clubs. For the next fifty years, the Tribout Shop specialized in exclusive European imports as well as the very best from American designers. Despite conjuring images of cowboys and the wild west, the iconic Stetson hat was produced in Philadelphia for over a century.

Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The World of the Eighteenth Century (for English Majors): Costume

Many notable names in American fashion made their homes in Philadelphia during the early years of the twentieth century. Stetson , occupied an impressive factory in Kensington, stretching across nine acres and producing nearly two million hats annually by Peter Thomson dominated the market for ubiquitous middy blouses and sailor dresses that were worn as school uniforms throughout the country.

Philadelphia shoes retained their elite status with the designs of Laird, Schober and Company, which won numerous industry accolades and sold at retailers throughout the United States. The economic collapse of had a lasting effect on American fashion, retail, and manufacturing.

By , French imports had dropped by 40 percent as department stores, specialty shops, and manufacturers turned to domestic talent to produce new styles. Many older stores were unable to keep afloat and were forced to close. Specialty stores like Nan Duskin and Sophy Curson , which had opened just prior to the stock market crash, defied the odds by surviving the Great Depression —a testament to the power of specialization and their knowledge of the consumer. Smaller and more focused than the larger department stores, these shops, named for their founders, could better navigate the mercurial world of high fashion.

Another female entrepreneur of note, milliner Mae Reeves , became one of the first African American women to own her own business in downtown Philadelphia, a millinery shop opened in and remaining in business for more than fifty years. Library of Congress. In the aftermath of the Second World War , fashion reflected the desires of a larger suburban population and their offspring.

The formality of city life was replaced whenever possible with more casual soft shirts worn without neckties and shirtwaist dresses made of new, easy-to-care-for synthetics like nylon, polyester, and acrylic. By the late s, fashion was in even more of a state of upheaval as traditional rules of dress were jettisoned for mini-skirts, bell-bottoms, and longer, natural hair for both sexes. Even conservative dressers were forced to adapt, and fashion markets splintered into competing niche markets. Individuality triumphed over the conformity of the past, a trend that showed no sign of abating in the twenty-first century.

As fashion changed in the s and s, so did Philadelphia area retailers. While the large department stores struggled in their Market Street locations and established branches in suburban shopping malls , smaller retailers such as Joan Shepp and Toby Lerner launched highly successful boutiques catering to consumers who favored easy-care sportswear and separates. During the s, a series of mergers and acquisitions eventually led to the end of the many historically important stores. Manufacturing in Philadelphia also mirrored changes taking place in the world of fashion.

Despite these success stories, garment manufacturing declined with prominent makers like Botany declaring bankruptcy and Stetson relocating to Missouri.

19th Century Fashion - How To Tell Different Decades Apart?

Although no longer a global center of manufacturing, the Philadelphia region remained headquarters to several prominent fashion companies such as Lily Pulitzer, Destination Maternity, and Urban Outfitters. The majority studied in New York, a reflection of the dominance of New York in the fashion industry. Philadelphia has been associated with fashionable goods since the mid-eighteenth century, when artisans used style to compete with European imports.

Manufacturers, publishers, and retailers continued to emphasize high style and set trends throughout the nineteenth century.


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    Clothing through American History: The Federal Era through Antebellum, –

    New Haven: Yale University Press, Farrell-Beck, Jane and Jean Parsons. Language eng. Publication Santa Barbara, Calif. Extent vi, p. Isbn System control number ocn OCoLC Library Locations Map Details. Riverview Public Library Borrow it. Library Links.

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